1-877-330-8888 rockwatcher@telus.net

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What Kind Of Replacement Battery Do I Need For The Rockwatcher?

A: The battery equivalent is CR2032 3volt (Original and Pro Edition)

Q: My Pro Edition Rockwatcher (Colored Buttons) Seems To Be Frozen, Will Not Reset, Buttons Appear To Be Inactive.

A: Most likely due to pressing the MEM button accidentaly. The Pro Edition has a 3-lap memory/recall. The timer is in a Lap/Split or total time recall as indicated above the time display. Press the MEM button to cycle through the recall/total time as indicated above the time indication; ensure there is no lap, recall or total indication above the time.

Q: How Do I Turn Off The Watch?

A: Like most watches, there is no on/off. The watch remains on without a big drain on the battery. In most cases, batteries can last anywhere from 2 to 5 years under normal conditions. (The original Rockwatcher should be left in “time-of-day” mode to prolong battery life.)

Q: What Is The Warranty On The Rockwatcher?

A: Watch failures are rare under normal conditions. Therefore, we like to address each failure. Please contact us on how to proceed.

Q: How Do I Turn Off The Time Of Day Alarm? Original Model Rockwatcher, Black Buttons. (The Beep During Stopwatch Operation Cannot Be Turned Off.)

A: Press the Lap/Split, followed by the Start/Stop button; the bell icon should disappear.

Why Do Curlers Time The Stone/Rock?

A: To determine the force needed to be applied to a rock so it stops at a desired location at the opposite end of the sheet. The force required will vary from sheet to sheet and will change during a game as well, so knowing how hard to throw the rock, before you throw it, will give you the ability and confidence to throw the perfect shot.

How is the the Stone/Rock Actually Timed?

A: There are three principal ways of timing curling stones: sheet timing or long timing; hog-to-hog timing; and interval timing or split timing. Each method of timing has specific strengths and applications. Sheet times are typically collected by measuring the time it takes a stone to travel from the hog line at the release end to stop at tee line at the far end. The “faster” (slicker) the ice is, the longer the sheet time will be.

Interval timing is a proven method that helps a curler judge weight. A curler can time a shot between two points, usually the back line (or tee line) and the first hog line. The “split” time is the time it takes the rock to travel from the back line (or tee line) to the hog line and will indicate its ability to make it to a relative location at the opposite end of the sheet.

Interval timing will give the curler a good understanding of changing ice conditions, fast or slow. With this interval time, the curler will learn to be more consistent in delivering the right amount of force (weight) for the required shot.

Sheet times are typically collected by measuring the time it takes a stone to travel from the hog line at the release end to stop at the tee line at the far end. The “faster” (slicker) the ice is, the longer the sheet time will be.

Hog-to-hog times are collected by measuring the time it takes a stone to travel from the near to the far hog line. This method can be used to time draws much like sheet timing. “Fast” ice is 14-14 ½ seconds by this method. However, a really good way to use hog-to-hog times is to learn a variety of takeout weights during practice.

THE Stopwatch For Curlers. Custom Designed to Improve Your Game!

ROCKWATCHER

Rockwatcher
10565 169 St.
Surrey, BC V4N 3H7

Phone: 1-877-330-8888

Email: rockwatcher@telus.net

 

Hours Of Operation

Monday - Friday:
08:00 AM - 04:00 PM PST

Saturday to Sunday:
Closed

 

Service Areas:

We serve customers worldwide

Have Questions? Email Us To Learn More.

9 + 3 =